Content Strategy: Is it all about digital?

Digital Content Strategies have become a popular topic among institutions, with many museums developing and even posting these strategies, aiming to stay accountable to their audiences. Open publishing allows museums to share details with their public, serving them and the museum mission simultaneously, while establishing trusted and sustainable audience relationships.

When a museum publishes their works either on their museum website, or through other social media and online channels, they’re able to expand the ability to engage with their public. From international museum members to local community researchers, digital strategies and engagement works to interact with anyone outside of the museum’s physical space. However, digital engagement is also much more than that. Digital strategies help to future-proof the institution, and create a workflow for the evolution of content, and the way content is delivered to audiences.

For example, if a museum rents handheld audio guides for self-guided tours, including a plan for that audio content in the museum’s digital content strategy can help to ensure the museum’s audio files are protected over time. Eventually, the hardware may become obsolete, and the museum may look to transfer the audio content to a platform that’s easier to share with their audiences. In this way, the museum is able to connect with their audience on a deeper level because they’re creating an opportunity to reformat their content for audiences of the future.

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), a Gallery Systems client, is challenging the notion of a digital content strategy by asking what would happen if the conversation isn’t about digital content, but instead is just about content? Chad Coerver, Chief Content Officer at SFMOMA, tackled this issue in a recent article posted to the SFMOMA Read content feed. “I see these virtual conversations as just another expression of a very human need for connectedness and context,” muses Coerver, “Regardless of whether we’re standing around the office cooler or sending images out into the digital ether, we are constantly writing the story of who we are, of our place in the world.”

Learn more about how SFMOMA is working to unify their content in Coerver’s article, “On Digital Content Strategy.”

Working on a digital strategy for your institution?

This guide provides insight into creating a strategic digital plan and looks at the digital strategies of a few Gallery Systems clients.

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2018-07-11T12:21:03+00:00

About the Author:

Cat Bradley became part of the Gallery Systems team in 2016, and has a background in art museums and diversity policy for nonprofits. Cat holds an MA from the University of Oregon in Arts Administration for marketing, a grad certificate in Nonprofit Management, and a BA from the University of Central Florida in Art History, specializing in public art and 20th Century Mexican Art. When she’s not writing case studies or analyzing market data, you can find her wandering the art museums and galleries of New York City, squeezing veggies at the Union Square Famers Market, or playing the ukulele at open mic night on the Lower East Side.